Does IT Outsourcing Make Sense For My Business

Outsourcing IT services is becoming more and more common for companies of all sizes, but some businesses are still on the fence. Entrepreneurs often want to do it all themselves, but as a business grows, managing key business functions such as IT and benefits becomes a bigger burden.

Once a luxury of mammoth companies, outsourcing has become a mainstream option for companies everywhere thanks to technology that makes communication easier and remote work capability accessible.

How will outsourcing affect my company culture? Many businesses worry that outsourcing will depersonalize their culture and make employees feel disconnected. However, great outsourcing partners know how to educate and empower their engineers on customer service, which includes encouraging engineers to blend in with every client’s culture and become a true part of the team. Ideal IT outsourcing partners won’t splinter a client’s company culture, they’ll actually help make it stronger.

Won’t employees be frustrated by working with outsourced IT help?
It’s hard for one person or a small group to be experts in everything required to manage and maintain a complex IT system. However, outsourced groups not only focus solely on their core areas, they have quick access to other trusted professionals in their company who can help if unfamiliar issues come up. If there is an emergency, it’s also easier to pull in more assistance from additional engineers to resolve problems quickly.

How much does IT outsourcing cost?
Some businesses shut down at the idea of outsourcing because they believe the cost will be too high, but many times outsourcing is actually more cost effective than hiring professionals in-house. Hiring involves human resources and benefits hurdles, and you risk someone wasting time if there isn’t enough to do or not being able to do jobs well if there is too much to do. The right outsourcing partner will evaluate your specific needs and prepare a custom package that uses your dollars efficiently.

When a new business is small, entrepreneurs often have to wear every hat, but as a company grows, learning to lean on partners to help with key functions becomes more necessary. Every company needs experts on their side, and working with outsourced partners can take a lot of the stress out of essential business needs so managers can focus on actually running the business.

Why TSP Engineers Actually Like Taking on Extra Work

By: Steven Conour, Senior Systems Specialist

I work as a technician for TSP, and I love my job! I’m one of those few Americans that can honestly say they love the company they work for. My job is always changing because that’s the nature of technology, but more than that, I’m always tackling new challenges because TSP gives me that level of freedom. TSP rewards out-of-the-box thinking, which not only gives us the flexibility to solve problems, but to find problems that need solving.

TSP has earned the trust of an incredible portfolio of clients because we don’t just do the job right, we find creative ways to make those extra tech headaches go away. It all boils down to our philosophy of making life better for every client. TSP has a “Boot Camp” training program, and part of what we cover is customer service. One of the things that sets TSP apart—and consistently wows clients—is that we don’t just fulfill contracts, we keep our eyes open for other problems we can solve.

Attend morning meetings.
We listen to the challenges clients face daily, and ask if are there recurring items we may be able to help with. Showing up at meetings gives us a voice, but it also helps us get to know the people we’re working with and become part of the client’s culture.

Talk with the client.
TSP engineers don’t have tunnel vision when it comes to projects. Instead of robotically limiting conversations with clients to the exact tasks we have individual ownership of, we make a point of getting to know clients to find out what other issues they’re having. You can’t offer a solution to a problem if you never bother to find out what the problems are.

Stay sharp on every bit of tech.
TSP engineers go through regular training workshops to ensure we’re all on the same page and staying sharp on the latest and greatest, but we also take extra steps to reach out to machine and tech reps to find out what’s new and what needs fixing. We meet with reps when they’re visiting and call them to stay in touch so we always know what’s going on.

We actually like taking on more work.
Adding services to a contract leads to obvious financial perks, but our commitment to solving problems goes beyond that. Additional services can lead to adding another engineer to the site, which means one more person to lean on and add to on-call rotations as well as that much more ability to serve the client. Adding services also means we get to expand our own opportunities to practice and learn new skills, which makes us that much more able to contribute to our value.

Some say that when a door closes, another one opens. I say we should wander the halls, jiggle the doorknobs, try every key on your ring. There’s no rule that says only one door can be open.

Supporting the Breast Cancer Movement as a United Company, TSP Races Together for the Cure

DALLAS TSP (Technology Service Professionals), a leading provider of information technology services to Fortune 500 companies, sponsored employee participation in the Susan G. Komen® North Texas Plano Race for the Cure® 5K this past weekend, proudly doing its part to support the fight against breast cancer.

A large part of TSP’s vision is investing time and money into the communities where we live, work and play. We make a consistent effort to rally employees around local events and causes that are near and dear to our employees. We had a great time walking together, and were proud to support the Susan G. Komen North Texas foundation,” said Rick Skaggs, co-founder of TSP.

The race took place on June 13 at HP and The Campus of Legacy in Plano, TX. Fourteen TSP employees participated together on team #TSProckstars.

The Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure Series is the world’s largest and most successful education and fundraising event for breast cancer ever created. The event raises significant funds and awareness for the breast cancer movement, celebrates breast cancer survivorship and honors those who have lost their battle with the disease.

TSP’s HR Manager Kristi Suddock encouraged TSP to get involved with Susan G. Komen North Texas because her family has been personally touched by breast cancer. Kristi has been involved with Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure for eight years, and has also walked in the Dallas/Fort Worth 3-Day (a 60-mile event) for five years, as well as staffing and volunteering for the event. Her family connection is one of a few featured in Komen’s 3-Day Stories.

“Breast cancer has affected my family significantly – my father passed away from breast cancer ten years ago, and both of my sisters are breast cancer survivors,” said Suddock. “I’m proud and grateful to work for a company that values charitable giving and community involvement to support this cause that’s so close to me.”

About TSP
TSP is a privately held information technology services company founded in 2002 by Rick Skaggs and Frank Gonzalez. The business provides top-tier services in enterprise solutions, shared solutions, and industrial automation. The Certified Minority Owned Business has more than 550 employees, and its service area includes more than 30 U.S. states as well as Canada. The company’s client portfolio includes Texas Instruments, International Paper, Hewlett-Packard, Goodyear, Georgia-Pacific, Dell, Raytheon, 3M, Hitachi, NetApp, Lockheed Martin, IBM, and Neiman Marcus. To learn more, visit http://mytsp.net.

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Five Tips For Sending Better Emails

Communication is everything in a successful business—and in a successful career. Email is one of the most used tools for staying in touch, but lots of people have bad email habits that transform it into a nuisance instead of a productive vehicle. Poor emails can cause stress, strife, confusion, and even tension, but these five essential tips will help avoid snafus that land messages in the junk folder.

Downplay emoticons.
Emoticons can be fun from time to time in personal messages, but they shouldn’t take the place of words. Winking faces, flapping raspberry tongues, and tears are fine for Saturday morning cartoons, but they don’t have a place in work email. Even when writing messages to friends within the company, use smileys sparingly. They are shortcuts that fail to express much, and when used in excess, they clog the screen with distractions and make messages seem less mature.

Be brief.
Emails aren’t research papers. Remember the three to five rule: Keep paragraphs limited to between three and five sentences, and keep emails limited to three to five paragraphs. Bullet points are a great way to section off themes because they’re short, readable, and easy to organize. If you have too much to say for one message, consider sending several separate messages by topic. This can make it easier for the recipient to understand the flow of information as well as sort and find it again.

Proofread.
The biggest source of email bloopers is usually because of forgetting to proofread. Autocorrect can be helpful, but sometimes it seems like it’s out to get us. Reading over messages before sending is well worth the extra minute or two. You may be in a hurry, but editing is worth it if you catch a major blooper before it goes off into cyberspace forever.

Double-check the recipient’s address.
Technology makes it easy to send messages. It also makes it easy to send messages to the wrong people, whether it’s our boss instead of a spouse or mom or an email about a hush-hush project that you accidentally forward to the entire company list. Double check the address before clicking away, and be extra careful when it comes to replying to the sender or replying all.

Leverage the subject line.
Subject lines have become like headlines when it comes to email. An empty one is less likely to get read, but a well-crafted subject line will help recipients know you mean business. Subject lines let you advertise the point quickly and summarize what the email is about. Don’t use a vague subject with just the word “Meeting.” Instead, give enough detail that the email will be clear and easy to find later, such as “Meeting: Q1 Team Performance Review.”

Listening and Responding Quickly Paves the Way for TSP’s Newest Customers

DALLAS – TSP (Technology Service Professionals), a leading provider of information technology services to Fortune 500 companies, announces two new customers, bringing the total number of active customers to more than 140, with a 95% customer retention rate.

Listening and responding quickly were key elements in the two new wins. “We received the new customer lead on June 2 and promptly contacted and had lunch with the potential customer two days later. Within four days, our candidate interviewed with the customer, and an offer was accepted just two days after the interview, with a start date of June 22,” said Ernie Almario, senior business manager, TSP.

Both new customers fall under TSP’s consulting services branch, which includes permanent placement, contract-to-hire, and term recruiting options. By utilizing TSP’s consulting services, customers can leave the time-consuming hiring process to TSP, and focus on their business objectives.

TSP’s new emerging business team was created in early 2015 and tasked with bringing new customers and business into the TSP family. These two new consulting services contracts are entirely credited to the success of the new emerging business team.

TSP firmly believes that success begins with a quick response to staffing needs, a thorough understanding of each position’s requirements, and a focus on employee retention and customer satisfaction.

“It’s not rocket science. We listen to what our customers need and respond with a personalized solution,” said Rick Skaggs, co-founder and president, TSP. “Many service providers respond to their customers with a pre-defined list of services before even listening to what their customer is telling them. At TSP, all of our solutions are custom-tailored to exactly what our clients need. I couldn’t be more proud of our growth and the emerging business team’s efforts. We warmly welcome Petsche & Associates and Tepsco as our newest valued customers,” said Skaggs.

About TSP
TSP is a privately held information technology services company founded in 2002 by Rick Skaggs and Frank Gonzalez. The business provides top-tier services in enterprise solutions, shared solutions, and industrial automation. The Certified Minority Owned Business has more than 550 employees, and its service area includes more than 30 U.S. states as well as Canada. The company’s client portfolio includes Texas Instruments, International Paper, Hewlett-Packard, Goodyear, Georgia-Pacific, Dell, Raytheon, 3M, Hitachi, NetApp, Lockheed Martin, IBM, and Neiman Marcus. To learn more, visit http://mytsp.net.

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Coupling Outstanding Customer Service with Emerging Business Team Efforts, TSP Continues to Grow

DALLAS – TSP (Technology Service Professionals), a leading provider of information technology services to Fortune 500 companies, announces seven new service contracts, which are expected to collectively bring approximately $1 million dollars in annual revenue to TSP. Each contract comes with a life expectancy of seven-plus years. TSP continues its impressive growth trend, in large part by coupling its commitment to outstanding customer service with the strategic efforts of its newly formed emerging business team.

TSP’s New Service Contracts:

  • Customer for over two years converted their existing time and materials (T&M) contract to a managed services contract.
  • Existing customer for over four years added a new QCS maintenance services contract in Port Hudson, LA.
  • New customer signed on with a consulting services contract via permanent placement, where TSP will work as a recruiting arm for the organization (TSP also works with customers on contract-to-hire and term recruiting bases).
  • Two longstanding customers added a consulting services contract each and increased the headcount of TSP employees onsite.
  • Industrial Automation customer added two new QCS maintenance services contracts in Tacoma, WA and Battle Creek, MI.

At the onset of 2015, TSP started a new, strategic sales organization within TSP, its emerging business team. This team is solely responsible for identifying and pursuing new growth opportunities, expanding TSP’s already prestigious roster of customers. The team is comprised of seasoned #TSProckstars who uniquely understand TSP’s vast portfolio of services and solutions.

“New customers and expanded service contracts are vital to the long-term success of TSP. We are thrilled to expand our business with existing clients like Neiman Marcus, Georgia Pacific, Hitachi Data Systems, KapStone Paper and Packaging Corporation, and RockTenn, and we enthusiastically welcome new customer Molex Incorporated,” said Rick Skaggs, co-founder and president, TSP.

“Providing exceptional value to our existing customer base fueled our growth to date. This is still at the core of who we are as a company, but in order to grow, we must pursue new business with both current and prospective customers. As these seven new contracts prove, our emerging business team has done a fantastic job so far. I look forward to seeing even more of their success in the future, as we look to TSP’s next group of marquee customers and contracts,” said Skaggs.

About TSP
TSP is a privately held information technology services company founded in 2002 by Rick Skaggs and Frank Gonzalez. The business provides top-tier services in enterprise solutions, shared solutions, and industrial automation. The Certified Minority Owned Business has more than 550 employees, and its service area includes more than 30 U.S. states as well as Canada. The company’s client portfolio includes Texas Instruments, International Paper, Hewlett-Packard, Goodyear, Georgia-Pacific, Dell, Raytheon, 3M, Hitachi, NetApp, Lockheed Martin, IBM, and Neiman Marcus. To learn more, visit http://mytsp.net.

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Does Your Service Provider Stay Cool In Emergencies?

Emergencies are a fact of life, but in the technology world, they’re more inevitability than possibility. Wires get crossed, servers overheat, blue screens pop up… And since the edge of Occam’s razor loves to shave close, machines usually pick the worst possible times to go haywire.

TSP’s comprehensive enterprise, shared, and industrial automation solutions ensure that maintenance is always a priority, but sometimes things just plain break. When your tech hits the fan, are you confident that your service professional can keep their calm? Wouldn’t we all prefer to work with a partner who keeps cool in crisis instead of one who flies off the handle?

Soft skills are often neglected in the tech services industry, but TSP believes personality plays a huge role in both the ease of daily maintenance and the level of stress involved in crisis management. We hire field experts, and many employees go through our custom Boot Camp to learn both soft and hard skills. Top technologies are covered to ensure service professionals are up to speed on the latest and greatest, but Boot Camp also emphasizes interpersonal customer service skills that illustrate why the way we serve clients is just as important as knowing which buttons to push.

When things go wrong with the machines we rely on, managing a crisis is a lot easier if the people helping you are easy to work with. Our service professionals keep customers posted on the status of a fix, never leave clients in the dark, and work tirelessly until everything is good to go. Most of all, we’re nice while we’re managing the problem! TSP’s goal is to make customers’ lives better, not worse.

Emergencies always come with a certain degree of pressure, but TSP service professionals are trained to handle whatever happens, plus be amiable while they’re healing the problem.